Hot on the heels of Billy Morgan being the first dude to get involved with a bit of four play, Canadian multi-cork specialist Max Parrot chimes in with his own quadruple NBD. But is it a 1620?

The answer, like so many questions posted on the internet, is no. It's not. It's a switch frontside 180 quadruple backflip, and we must say we reckon he could have even gone full penta on that bad boy. Fist of nuff respect, you mad bastard.

It's certainly a mind-bending feat of big jump boarding, no debate about that, but a 1620? I, for one, can't see it. Does it matter? There are certainly more important things in the world to get hung up on, but I'm gonna stick my neck out here and say, yes, it does. Call a spade a spade and not a malformed non-fabulous earth excavating unicorn horn when it's just, in fact, a spade.

Corks need to either prevent wine from escaping a bottle or trace the form of the thing that opens wine, and this does neither. What Max does is take off backwards, turn 90 degrees, backflip four times, turn another 90 degrees, and land. And all that arguably with the time to flip another time before the last 90.

It's nuts what Parrot has done, but I just can't see the one-thousand-six-hundred-and-twenty degrees of rotation in there. Because it isn't. There's no corking. Travis Rice won the Air+Style Munich back in the day with a double backflip 180 and everything was gravy without anyone having to call it a 900 double cork, so why put a bunch of numbers next to what is, undoubtably, a pretty insane feat in its own right?

But, bollocks to my thoughts and all. Internet, what do you make of this, the second entry into snowboarding's four flipping future?