Olympic Gold Medallist Kaitlyn Farrington Retires from Competitive Snowboarding Due to Spinal Condition - Onboard Magazine

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Olympic Gold Medallist Kaitlyn Farrington Retires from Competitive Snowboarding Due to Spinal Condition

It’s a sad day for snowboarding today with the news that 25 year old Olympic gold medallist Kaitlyn Farrington has been forced to retire from competitive snowboarding due to a spinal condition called congenital cervical stenosis. We wish her all the best in this challenging time.

After suffering a fall in Austria in October 2014 during a Giro shoot and going completely numb from head to toe, Kaitlyn Farrington rightly headed into hospital to get everything checked out.

I am so thankful for my friends, family and sponsors for their support throughout this time. It’s been an unbelievable run and I look forward to my next quarter century. Cheers to early retirement…

The resulting diagnosis, confirmed by multiple specialists, has been an incredibly difficult one for Kaitlyn to accept. ‘Congenital cervical stenosis’ is a narrowing of the spinal canal in the neck which increases the likelihood of more serious spinal injuries. The condition is not passed on from parents to children but is present at birth.

Following the news, Kaitlyn has been forced to make the difficult decision to retire from professional snowboarding at the age of 25.

Kaitlyn Farrington riding in the Sochi 2014 half pipe finals

We had the pleasure of meeting Kaitlyn for the first time in November 2014 and can honestly say that she was one of the funnest, most positive people we’ve ever met. We’re incredibly bummed with what she has had to go through here and while we’re sad that we won’t be seeing Kaitlyn sending it in the halfpipe anymore, we hope that the condition won’t stop her from strapping in.

Here’s what Kaitlyn had to say today via her instagram:

Here we go. The past few months have been really difficult. I’ve met with many specialists and they all confirmed I have congenital cervical stenosis of my spine, a condition I was born with and never knew I had until a recent fall in Austria led me to get an MRI. It’s taken me these few months to come to terms with my diagnosis and the fact that I must retire from competitive halfpipe snowboarding. I am so thankful for my friends, family and sponsors for their support throughout this time. It’s been an unbelievable run and I look forward to my next quarter century. Cheers to early retirement…

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